jQuery maintainers continue modernization initiative with deprecation of jQuery Mobile

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By: Michał Gołębiowski-Owczarek, Felix Nagel, and the jQuery team

Editor’s Note: the following blog post was originally published to the OpenJS Foundation Blog.

jQuery maintainers are continuing to modernize its overall project that still is one of the most widely deployed JavaScript libraries today. The team announced that the cross-platform jQuery Mobile project under its umbrella will be fully deprecated as of October 7, 2021. New technologies for mobile app development have evolved since this project was launched in 2010, so we’re encouraging developers to plan for this jQuery Mobile transition.

Please note that:

  • The Download Builder will remain available.
  • Mobile 1.4 is not compatible with the new jQuery Core.
  • Issues will be turned off. Please report critical security bugs via email to security@jquery.com. 

Celebrating jQuery Mobile’s History

jQuery Mobile was conceived and announced in 2010, three years after the launch of jQuery.  The project was exciting and ambitious. At announcement, jQuery Mobile promised compatibility across multiple platforms, browsers, and versions. Several mobile browser vendors, including Palm and Mozilla, signed on to sponsor the project: 


“The jQuery community has focused on making the Web as productive and fun as possible. When we heard the mission behind jQuery Mobile, we wanted to help. With webOS we have shown that the Web platform is fantastic for developers, so we are excited to help make jQuery Mobile as good as it can be.” -Dion Almaer – Palm

At the time, the mobile web was desperately in need of a framework capable of working across all browsers, allowing developers to build truly mobile web applications. jQuery had already changed the way developers were building on the web, making it easier (and faster) to create secure, compliant applications. 

With jQuery Mobile, the project’s goals were to bring the ease-of-use of jQuery to HTML-capable mobile device browsers and to make it easier for developers to build progressively enhanced web applications. Led by Todd Parker of Filament Group, a development studio known for their work on cross platform and accessibility-first applications, jQuery Mobile launched its alpha release in October 2010. 

Alpha features included several components, layouts and theming tools that simplified the process of building a mobile web application. Progressive enhancement and graceful degradation, which were hot (and tricky) topics in web development at the time, featured heavily: jQuery Mobile promised developers and users the best possible experience their platform could handle. Accessibility was another key feature, with Mobile promising a user experience that could be navigated by touch, keyboard, or screen reader via ARIA compatible components. Additional features such as simplicity, file size, and the ability to deploy jQuery Mobile applications through an app store drove further excitement. 

Over the next year, the jQuery Mobile team continued to add compatible platforms and browsers, new components and themes, and eventually a themeroller tool that allowed developers to configure and download themes without writing any CSS. 

The community response was overwhelming – by the time 1.0 was released in November 2011, jQuery Mobile had gathered over 125 contributors, dozens of articles, tutorials and demos, 8 published books, and a gallery of sites, plugins and extensions to welcome and introduce new developers to the project. 

jQuery Mobile continued to make monthly releases throughout 2012 and 2013, regularly adding and improving components, resolving compatibility issues with mobile browsers, and making performance improvements to speed up page rendering times. The development team also continued to prioritize and highlight the importance of responsive web design and accessibility principles with each new release. 

As the number of components and widgets swelled – both those that were officially supported or widely adopted in the community, performance and compatibility issues with mobile platforms, browsers, and jQuery core were also exacerbated. Though the project did have some automated tests, there were still a number of items that needed to be tested manually, which slowed down the development process. 

In mid 2013, Jasper de Groot became the project lead and announced tighter development collaboration between jQuery UI and jQuery Mobile teams, sharing goals, roadmaps and code in order to ease the workload for both groups. The team continued to provide maintenance releases and support, but progress continued to slow under the burden of testing and supporting such a large community. 

Alex Schmitz took over the lead in July 2014, but by that time the size of the project, combined with the pace and availability of new mobile browser features, made finding a viable path forward for the project increasingly difficult. 

The latest stable version was released October 2014. Alex and team made a big push to update jQuery Mobile again in 2017 with the release of an alpha version of 1.5; this version would see compatibility with jQuery 3.0 and npm support among other things.

jQuery Mobile became an OpenJS Foundation Emeritus project in 2018, signifying that the goals of the project had been achieved.

jQuery modernization initiative

The depreciation of jQuery mobile follows the careful transition of another project under the jQuery project umbrella, jQuery UI.

jQuery Core is still actively maintained and widely implemented. As part of its modernization initiative, the team also has been making a series of updates this year to its infrastructure, including migrating and improving its CDN.

Celebrating jQuery Mobile Maintainers and Contributors

The contributions to jQuery Mobile opened up opportunities for people and organizations around the world, and we are thankful for all the contributions over the years. We would like to give an extra shout out of gratitude to the past maintainers of jQuery Mobile: Alexander Schmitz, Jasper de Groot, and Todd Parker.

jQuery maintainers update and transition jQuery UI as part of overall modernization efforts

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By: Michał Gołębiowski-Owczarek, Felix Nagel, and the jQuery team

Editor’s Note: the following blog post was originally published to the OpenJS Foundation Blog.

The jQuery project is actively maintained and widely implemented — it’s used by 73% of 10 million most popular websites. As part of its ongoing effort to modernize the project, jQuery maintainers have taken steps to wind down one of its projects under the jQuery umbrella through a careful transition. 

Today, jQuery UI announced version 1.13 — its first release in 5 years and the project’s final planned release. Perhaps the most important update is that jQuery UI 1.13 now runs on the latest version of jQuery Core, providing a number of browser compatibility and security updates that have been missing from previous releases, in addition to community fixes and improvements. The jQuery UI Download Builder has also been restored and updated so developers can continue to download UI along with their favorite themes. The release is part of an ongoing series of updates across all jQuery projects.

jQuery UI is in maintenance-only mode. Users should not expect any new releases, though patches may be issued to resolve critical security, interoperability, or regression bugs. Trac, the project’s bug-tracking tool, has been put in read-only mode and developers are asked to file any critical issues on the project’s GitHub repository

jQuery UI was first launched in September 2007 as a curated set of user interface interactions, effects, widgets, and themes built on top of the jQuery library. It quickly gained popularity because it was one of the best tested and most accessible UI frameworks of its time. The tool helped developers build UI components such as form controls and date pickers using the best practices back then. In its heyday, jQuery UI was adopted by a broad set of enterprises including Pinterest, PayPal, IMDB, Huffington Post, and Netflix. 

Today, jQuery UI continues to be an important testbed for jQuery Core updates, helping the maintainer team spot bugs and interoperability issues that arise as the web platform evolves. 

Celebrating jQuery UI’s History

With the launch of jQuery in 2006, web developers were able to access and manipulate DOM and CSS faster and easier than ever before. Thousands of open source jQuery widgets and plugins were created to handle previously tricky problems, like showing and hiding elements, rotating through image carousels, or picking dates on a calendar. The jQuery ecosystem became a playground full of tools for making new and interesting interactions possible on the web. 

‘New and interesting’ doesn’t always translate to ‘good and useful’ — though there were many good plugins available, it was not always easy to tell which would be the most performant or provide the best user experience. Developers might have to go searching for the right tools or worse, spend significant time swapping through several plugins to figure out which one worked best. Further, there were few examples of best practices in user experience on the web, so visitors to one website could have vastly different (and thus confusing) interactions when they performed a similar task on another website. 

Members of the jQuery Core team wanted to help developers write performant, high-quality, and reusable jQuery components for their sites and applications. After some discussion, the idea for a second library with strict standards for coding, documentation, and theming was born. The project’s vision and goals included: developing a collaborative design process; providing flexible styling and themes; creating elegant visual and interaction design; providing a robust API; and prioritizing progressive enhancement, accessibility, internationalization and localization support.

In September 2007, jQuery UI officially launched as a set of user interface interactions, effects, widgets, and themes built on top of jQuery. Soon after, the team shifted their focus to provide a full set of APIs and methods to allow developers to create flexible, full-featured widgets that met high standards of quality. CSS effects such as easing and animation were added in and helped developers create more modern, enhanced experiences. The team at Filament Group later added a ThemeRoller, allowing developers to get started quickly by providing customizable theme boilerplate. ThemeRoller is still operational today.  

By the end of 2008, jQuery UI had an exploding community of users, developers, and interaction designers regularly providing updates and improvements to the project as best practices and style preferences evolved. Between 2009 and 2016, the community provided a variety of new official and unofficial themes and plugins, interoperability and other bug fixes, robust testing processes, and support for multiple versions of jQuery. 

jQuery UI’s prior official release came in September 2016, nearly a decade after it started. In that timeframe, the jQuery community had helped inspire dozens of other open source projects, pattern and component libraries. But newer CSS frameworks and approaches were taking hold, and slowly the community moved on to other projects. The UI team and jQuery Mobile teams merged, and the group focused more on maintenance and compatibility with jQuery Core.  

jQuery UI became an OpenJS Foundation Emeritus project in 2018, recognizing that it was winding down while noting the significance it had for the JavaScript ecosystem.

Celebrating jQuery UI Maintainers and Contributors

The scope of the project and the inclusiveness of the community was responsible for helping countless web makers develop a love and appreciation for user experience, localization, internationalization, accessibility, and clean, reusable code. Though many hours of work and contribution went into making jQuery UI a successful library, the jQuery UI core team deserves extra recognition for more than a decade of hard work shepherding the work and the community throughout the project’s lifecycle. Alex Schmitz, Jörn Zaefferer, Felix Nagel, Mike Sherov, Rafael Xavier de Souza, and Scott González led a team of many core contributors and more than 300 additional authors.

Additional gratitude is owed to Michał Gołębiowski-Owczarek for preparing the 1.13 release and stewarding the repository for the past year. 

OpenJS Foundation will forever be grateful for the work of these open source developers and the impact they had on the ecosystem through their work. Please join us in celebrating these developers and jQuery UI!

jQuery UI 1.13.0 released

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After a long break, it is our pleasure to announce the 1.13.0 release. The main focus of this release was improving compatibility with recent jQuery versions so we postponed most breaking changes like removal of deprecated APIs and removal of legacy browser support to a possible future release.

Usage of deprecated jQuery APIs have been removed. jQuery UI 1.13 triggers no jQuery Migrate warnings when running its test suite against jQuery 3.6.0 with jQuery Migrate 3.3.2, i.e. the latest versions at the moment of this release.

A few security issues have been fixed:

Support for jQuery 1.7 has been dropped; jQuery 1.8 & newer remain supported.

In this release, all individual module files as well as bundled jQuery UI copies produced by the Download Builder have all its code running in strict mode. This shouldn’t matter for most users as jQuery has been running in strict mode since 3.0 released in 2016.

Apart from that, two small features were added:

  1. Accordion’s header option may now accept not only a selector matching header elements but also a function taking the accordion element as a parameter and returning the header elements; more details in the docs for the header option.
  2. Datepicker options now include the optional onUpdateDatepicker callback, called when the datepicker widget’s DOM is updated.

To simplify the maintenance of jQuery UI, we’re sunsetting the old bug tracker at https://bugs.jqueryui.com (we’ll keep it in read-only mode) in favor of GitHub issues.

jQuery UI has struggled with finding contributors for the past few years; our goal is to move it more to a maintenance state: we’ll make sure the library is compatible with new jQuery releases and that security issues are fixed but no new significant feature work is planned. We’ll also try to fix important regressions from jQuery UI 1.12.1; older long-standing bugs may not get fixed. We’ll get a longer blog post about the state of jQuery UI when we release 1.13 final. Note that this does not affect jQuery Core which is still actively maintained.

Download

File Downloads

Git (contains source files, with @VERSION replaced with 1.13.0, base theme only)

Install via bower

  • bower install jquery/jquery-ui#1.13.0

jQuery CDN, powered by StackPath

Google Ajax Libraries API (CDN)

Microsoft Ajax CDN (CDN)

Custom Download Builder

Changelog

See the 1.13 Upgrade Guide for a list of changes that may affect you when upgrading from 1.12.x. For full details on what’s included in this release see the 1.13.0 Changelog.

Thanks

Thanks to all who helped with this release, specifically: A. Wells, Albert Johansson, Alexander Schmitz, c-lambert, claudi, Eirik Sletteberg, Evelyn Masso, Fatér Zsolt, Felix Nagel, Florian Wegscheider, Gez Quinn, GitHub, Horus68, Hrvoje Novosel, Jeremy Mickelson, jigar gala, Jo Liss, Jérémy Munsch, Jörn Zaefferer, Kevin Cupp, Konstantin Dinev, Kyle Rosenberg, Luke Brookhart, Maksymenkov Eugene, Micah Miller, Michał Gołębiowski-Owczarek, Mikolaj Wolicki, milk54, OskarNS, pallxk, Patrick McKay, Paul Capron, Petri Partio, Robert Brignull, Robin, Ryan Oriecuia, sakshi87, Scott González, Sergei Ratnikov, Simon Asika, Szabolcs Szabolcsi-Toth.

Comments

Note: please report bugs to the jQuery UI Bug Tracker; support questions should be posted on Stack Overflow with the jquery-ui tag. Please don’t use comments to report bugs.

If you have feedback on us doing our release for jQuery UI 1.13.0, feel free to leave a comment below. Thank you.

jQuery UI 1.13.0-rc.3 released

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We’re happy to announce the 1.13.0-rc.3 release of jQuery UI. The only changes in that version compared to 1.13.0-rc.2 that we announced a few weeks ago are fixes to themes.

Due to a CSS specificity issue, blank icons in 1.13.0-rc.2 weren’t actually blank; we increased the specificity of a relevant selector to fix the issue.

The next set of issues were caused by a few changes to themes that were made to fix other issues and to improve how various themes look. Unfortunately, those changes were incomplete and caused bigger issues. Given the maintenance status of jQuery UI, we’ve decided to revert the changes instead. While it brings some issues from jQuery UI 1.12 back, those issues have been there for many years so existing projects already had to adapt. Old & known bugs are better than new & unknown ones, especially with limited resources to maintain the project. This should also make it easier to update from jQuery UI 1.12 to 1.13.

See the 1.13.0-rc.2 blog post for more details about the goals of the 1.13 release.

Download

File Downloads

Git (contains source files, with @VERSION not yet replaced with 1.13.0-rc.3, base theme only)

Comments

Note: please report bugs to the jQuery UI Bug Tracker; support questions should be posted on Stack Overflow with the jquery-ui tag. Please don’t use comments to report bugs.

If you have feedback on us doing our RC release for jQuery UI 1.13.0, feel free to leave a comment below. Thank you.

jQuery UI 1.13.0-rc.2 released

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After a long break, it is our pleasure to announce the 1.13.0-rc.2 release. The release is feature-complete, we just wanted to give developers some time to test it & report any critical issues before we release the final. We didn’t find any such issues during our internal testing. If no blocking issues get reported, we expect to release 1.13.0 final in a few weeks.

You might be wondering what happened to 1.13.0-rc.1. A critical issue in the release script made the final built file not work at all, only individual AMD modules were fine. This made us not announce that release.

The main focus of this release was improving compatibility with recent jQuery versions so we postponed most breaking changes like removal of deprecated APIs and removal of legacy browser support to a possible future release.

Usage of deprecated jQuery APIs have been removed. jQuery UI 1.13 triggers no jQuery Migrate warnings when running its test suite against jQuery 3.6.0 with jQuery Migrate 3.3.2, i.e. the latest versions at the moment of this release.

Support for jQuery 1.7 has been dropped; jQuery 1.8 & newer remain supported.

In this release, all individual module files as well as bundled jQuery UI copies produced by the Download Builder have all its code running in strict mode. This shouldn’t matter for most users as jQuery has been running in strict mode since 3.0 released in 2016.

Apart from that, two small features were added:

  1. Accordion’s header option may now accept not only a selector matching header elements but also a function taking the accordion element as a parameter and returning the header elements; more details in the docs for the header option.
  2. Datepicker options now include the optional onUpdateDatepicker callback, called when the datepicker widget’s DOM is updated.

To simplify the maintenance of jQuery UI, we’re sunsetting the old bug tracker at https://bugs.jqueryui.com (we’ll keep it in read-only mode) in favor of GitHub issues.

jQuery UI has struggled with finding contributors for the past few years; our goal is to move it more to a maintenance state: we’ll make sure the library is compatible with new jQuery releases and that security issues are fixed but no new significant feature work is planned. We’ll also try to fix important regressions from jQuery UI 1.12.1; older long-standing bugs may not get fixed. We’ll get a longer blog post about the state of jQuery UI when we release 1.13 final. Note that this does not affect jQuery Core which is still actively maintained.

Download

File Downloads

Git (contains source files, with @VERSION not yet replaced with 1.13.0-rc.2, base theme only)

Comments

Note: please report bugs to the jQuery UI Bug Tracker; support questions should be posted on Stack Overflow with the jquery-ui tag. Please don’t use comments to report bugs.

If you have feedback on us doing our RC release for jQuery UI 1.13.0, feel free to leave a comment below. Thank you.

The Future of jQuery UI and jQuery Mobile

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The last few years have been difficult for the jQuery UI and jQuery Mobile projects. The projects have suffered from lack of resources and funding and loss of contributors due to a variety of factors. These combined factors have nearly stopped development on both projects. To remedy this situation we have decided to make some changes in the projects’ teams in addition to how they work.

Scott Gonzalez has lead the jQuery UI project for many years now and has helped to improve the quality tremendously. He has decided to step down from leading the project though he will still be helping in various ways. In an attempt to best utilize resources we have decided to combine the 2 teams into a single team under the leadership of Alex Schmitz, a long time jQuery UI contributor as well as the lead for jQuery Mobile. What this means is that the combined contributors will be able to serve the projects better, since both projects are very tightly coupled as jQuery Mobile depends upon jQuery UI. This does not mean that the two projects will become a single project. Both projects will continue to exist in their own repositories. However, we do hope to continue reducing the amount of duplicated code and widgets in the projects moving anything common to jQuery UI. Eventually, making jQuery Mobile more of an app framework with all the widgets living in jQuery UI.

In the past, when someone wanted to join the jQuery UI or jQuery Mobile teams we expected them to contribute to the library as a whole. We think going forward this needs to change; we will now be looking for and accepting people that are just interested in maintaining a single piece of the library, requiring a much smaller time contribution. So, if someone is just interested in working on sortable they could just lead the sortable widget without having to contribute to any other parts of the two libraries. This will not only allow for more focused and less time consuming contribution but also allow better specialization within our team.

In the past we have done all communication through IRC. Over time however, we have seen a large decrease in the number of people on IRC while other projects have had great results with easier to use tools like Slack. As a result, we will be switching to Slack for daily communication and meetings. We hope that this will ease contributions and interactions with potential new team members. Anyone can join the new Slack channel by navigating to http://bit.ly/2Btf6pu

In conclusion, we are currently very interested in attracting new team members to the combined jQuery UI and jQuery Mobile team. Anyone who is interested can feel free to reach out to Alex Schmitz, the new team lead for both projects, join our slack channel or even find us on IRC (we are still there). jQuery UI and jQuery Mobile rely on contributions from the community and can only continue to exist with your help!

jQuery UI 1.12.1

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We’re proud to announce our latest stable release. jQuery UI 1.12 features two new widgets, an updated base theme, overhauled effects, improved environment support and numerous bug fixes!

What happened to 1.12.0?

You may have noticed that even though 1.12.0 was released back in July, there was never any announcement. We had several issues surrounding the release, some code issues, but mostly infrastructure issues. Because the infrastructure issues took so long to resolve, we decided to wait until the 1.12.1 release to officially announce 1.12.

The big changes in 1.12 are:

  • New theme: Our long-time default grayscale theme Smoothness has been succeeded by a modern theme with some colors, less gradients and some other improvements. The new theme is already live on ThemeRoller (where you can also find the ‘Smoonthness’ under the Gallery tab).
  • New widgets: Controlgroup replaces buttonset and adds support for selectmenu and the new checkboxradio widget. You can see the new widgets in action in the controlgroup and checkboxradio demos.
  • New classes option: All widgets got a new option, called classes. This gives a lot more control over visual styling and custom theming. For example, building a Bootstrap theme for jQuery UI is now a lot easier. See the Learning jQuery article for more information.
  • New method: The .labels() method finds all label elements associated with the first selected element, mimicking the native labels property.
  • API redesign: Button: The button widget has undergone an API redesign, splitting out functionality for different types of buttons into separate components (see the new widgets mentioned above). Make sure to read the upgrade guide so you can migrate away from the deprecated APIs. The generated markup has also changed, so any custom styling may need to be updated as well.
  • npm/browserify/webpack support: The jquery-ui package on npm is now owned and maintained by the jQuery UI team. In addition, we’ve updated package.json and changed the directory structure to work better with tools like browserify and webpack. See Jörn Zaefferer’s demo for webpack usage information.
  • Effects overhaul: The effects API has received a major overhaul, introducing many new APIs and rewriting effects to use CSS clip for smoother and less error-prone animations. In addition, the transfer effect has been replaced with a .transfer() method.
  • Dropped jQuery 1.6.x support: jQuery UI 1.12 officially supports jQuery 1.7.0 – 3.1.0.
  • Reduced old IE support: jQuery UI 1.11 officially dropped support for IE7 but left all the existing workarounds in place. jQuery UI 1.12 has removed all of the IE7 workarounds. In addition, official support for IE8, IE9, and IE10 have been removed, but the workarounds are still in place and will be removed in 1.13. This coincides with Microsoft’s end of regular (non-extended) support for these browsers which occurred in January.
  • Bug fixes: Over 100 bugs have been fixed!

Download

File Downloads

Git (contains source files, with @VERSION replaced with 1.12.1, base theme only)

Install via bower

  • bower install jquery/jquery-ui#1.12.1

jQuery CDN, powered by MaxCDN

Google Ajax Libraries API (CDN)

Microsoft Ajax CDN (CDN)

Custom Download Builder

Changelog

See the 1.12 Upgrade Guide for a list of changes that may affect you when upgrading from 1.11.x. For full details on what’s included in this release see the 1.12.0 Changelog and 1.12.1 Changelog.

Thanks

Thanks to all who helped with this release, specifically: abacada, Ablay Keldibek, acwolff, Adam Foster, afercia, agcolom, aldra, Alexander Schmitz, alexandis, Alexey Balchunas, aliedtke, allenstyle, Alyosha Pushak, Amanpreet Singh, Amine HADDAD, Anne-Gaelle Colom, apeterson, apushak, Atletismo343, atomiomi, baton, bchiasson, Ben Mosher, Benjamin Albert, bernhardsirlinger, bleshik, bmorearty, Bruno Pérel, camurai, ChaseWagoner, Chen Eshchar, chkpnt, christianbalz, ckn, cok666n, Dan Strohl, Daniel Owens, daniel-o, darodaro, davenaeder, dcherman, dmack, dmethvin, DSB, dstrohl, eccenux, epascarello, Eric Lee Carraway, euyuil, eXaminator, ezufelt, ezyang, Fahad Ahmad, feedbloo, Felix Nagel, fercsi, Francesc Baeta, G-rom, Gabriel Schulhof, gf3, ggkovacs, gibe, Giovanni Giacobbi, gnarf, Gruewo, Hannah Methvin, harpojaeger, HikingMike, igrunert, Jaegers, janom, Jasper de Groot, jazzyCamel, jclarke, jga8, jhfrench, Jiabao Wu, jnik, Johannes Schäfer, Jyoti Deka, Jörn Zaefferer, kbwood, kiechii, kiro, Konstantin Dinev, kzys, Leonardo Balter, Liran Sharir, Lisa Seacat DeLuca, llehmann, lucas.ams, Luke Page, m-berling, Macavelli, Maksim Ryzhikov, Mani Mishra, mar10w, Marco Ziech, Marcus Warren, Matt Brundage, mattbasta, mfazekas, Michael Lelli, Michael Orchard, michaelcm, Michał Gołębiowski, Mike Sherov, Mohammed Alshehri, mohs8421, monojp, mpetrovich, Mukul Hase, Myeongjin Lee, Nils Heuermann, orfc, Patricia Juarez, Patrick1701, Peter Dave Hello, Peter Kehl, petersendidit, pgpp05, Piotr Baran, piuccio, PutKettleOn, Rafael Xavier de Souza, ramijarrar, Rand Scullard, rden, rdworth, rjollos, rmacfadyen, romain-granai, Ryan Oriecuia, sandygettings, Scott González, sebfz1, sephii, shannonhochkins, shokkobon, Siebrand Mazeland, sp2, sparkybg, Spencer Davis, Spetnik, spjonez, Statocaster, stew, sup, tasso85, teh-botol, Thomas Applencourt, Thomas Meyer, Timo Tijhof, TJ VanToll, tristian2, urkle, Victor Homyakov, Ville Skyttä, Weston Ruter, WickedDevils, zerocrates.

The Road Ahead

In parallel to this release we’ve been working on several significant rewrites that will make it into future releases:

  • Datepicker and Globalize: We’re working on a full rewrite of the datepicker widget. The rewrite will feature a far simpler API that will make customizations a lot easier. The rewrite builds on top of the rewritten Globalize library, which builds on top of CLDR, a comprehensive source for globalization data.
  • Interactions: We’re working on a rewrite of our interactions like draggable, on top of pointer events, along with a polyfill to map mouse and touch events to pointer events. This will put the new interactions on an event model that works on all devices.

Comments

Note: please do NOT use the comments section of this blog post for reporting bugs. Bug reports should be filed in the jQuery UI Bug Tracker and support questions should be posted on the jQuery Forum.

If you have feedback on us doing our release for jQuery UI 1.12.1, feel free to leave a comment below. Thank you.

jQuery UI 1.12.0 Release Candidate 2

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The second release candidate for jQuery UI 1.12 is out, fixing a few regressions in our first and only beta. You can find details for the bug fixes in the changelog for 1.12.0-rc2.

If you’re new to our 1.12 pre-releases, the big changes in 1.12 are:

  • New theme: Our long-time default grayscale theme Smoothness has been succeeded by a modern theme with some colors, less gradients and some other improvements. The new theme is already live on ThemeRoller (where you can also find the ‘Smoonthness’ under the Gallery tab).
  • New widgets: Controlgroup replaces buttonset and adds support for selectmenu and the new checkboxradio widget. You can see the new widgets in action in the controlgroup and checkboxradio demos.
  • New classes option: All widgets got a new option, called classes. This gives a lot more control over visual styling and custom theming. For example, building a Bootstrap theme for jQuery UI is now a lot easier.
  • New method: The .labels() method finds all label elements associated with the first selected element, mimicking the native labels property.
  • npm/browserify/webpack support: The jquery-ui package on npm is now owned and maintained by the jQuery UI team. In addition, we’ve updated package.json and changed the directory structure to work better with tools like browserify and webpack. See Jörn Zaefferer’s demo for webpack usage information.
  • Effects overhaul: The effects API has received a major overhaul, introducing many new APIs and rewriting effects to use CSS clip for smoother and less error-prone animations. In addition, the transfer effect has been replaced with a .transfer() method.
  • Dropped jQuery 1.6.x support: jQuery UI 1.12 officially supports jQuery 1.7.0 – 2.1.4.
  • Reduced old IE support: jQuery UI 1.11 officially dropped support for IE7 but left all the existing workarounds in place. jQuery UI 1.12 has removed all of the IE7 workarounds. In addition, official support for IE8, IE9, and IE10 have been removed, but the workarounds are still in place and will be removed in 1.13. This coincides with Microsoft’s end of regular (non-extended) support for these browsers which occurred in January.
  • Bug fixes: Over 60 bugs have been fixed!

For the first time, we have our upgrade guide and API documentation ready during the pre-release phase. For a full list of changes in jQuery UI 1.12, see the list of fixed tickets. And to see what’s coming next, check out our roadmap.

Download

File Downloads

Git (contains source files, with @VERSION not yet replaced with 1.12.0-rc.2, base theme only)

Comments

Note: please do NOT use the comments section of this blog post for reporting bugs. Bug reports should be filed in the jQuery UI Bug Tracker and support questions should be posted on the jQuery Forum.

If you have feedback on us doing our 2nd pre release for jQuery UI 1.12, feel free to leave a comment below. Thank you.

jQuery UI 1.12.0 Release Candidate 1

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The first release candidate for jQuery UI 1.12 is out, fixing a few regressions in our first and only beta. You can find details for the bug fixes in the changelog for 1.12.0-rc1.

If you’re new to our 1.12 pre-releases, the big changes in 1.12 are:

  • New theme: Our long-time default grayscale theme Smoothness has been succeeded by a modern theme with some colors, less gradients and some other improvements. The new theme is already live on ThemeRoller (where you can also find the ‘Smoonthness’ under the Gallery tab).
  • New widgets: Controlgroup replaces buttonset and adds support for selectmenu and the new checkboxradio widget. You can see the new widgets in action in the controlgroup and checkboxradio demos.
  • New classes option: All widgets got a new option, called classes. This gives a lot more control over visual styling and custom theming. For example, building a Bootstrap theme for jQuery UI is now a lot easier.
  • New method: The .labels() method finds all label elements associated with the first selected element, mimicking the native labels property.
  • npm/browserify/webpack support: The jquery-ui package on npm is now owned and maintained by the jQuery UI team. In addition, we’ve updated package.json and changed the directory structure to work better with tools like browserify and webpack. See Jörn Zaefferer’s demo for webpack usage information.
  • Effects overhaul: The effects API has received a major overhaul, introducing many new APIs and rewriting effects to use CSS clip for smoother and less error-prone animations. In addition, the transfer effect has been replaced with a .transfer() method.
  • Dropped jQuery 1.6.x support: jQuery UI 1.12 officially supports jQuery 1.7.0 – 2.1.4.
  • Reduced old IE support: jQuery UI 1.11 officially dropped support for IE7 but left all the existing workarounds in place. jQuery UI 1.12 has removed all of the IE7 workarounds. In addition, official support for IE8, IE9, and IE10 have been removed, but the workarounds are still in place and will be removed in 1.13. This coincides with Microsoft’s end of regular (non-extended) support for these browsers which occurred in January.
  • Bug fixes: Over 60 bugs have been fixed!

For the first time, we have our upgrade guide and API documentation ready during the pre-release phase. For a full list of changes in jQuery UI 1.12, see the list of fixed tickets. And to see what’s coming next, check out our roadmap.

Download

File Downloads

Git (contains source files, with @VERSION not yet replaced with 1.12.0-rc.1, base theme only)

Comments

Note: please do NOT use the comments section of this blog post for reporting bugs. Bug reports should be filed in the jQuery UI Bug Tracker and support questions should be posted on the jQuery Forum.

If you have feedback on us doing our 2nd pre release for jQuery UI 1.12, feel free to leave a comment below. Thank you.

jQuery UI 1.12.0 Beta 1

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The first beta release for jQuery UI 1.12 is out with numerous bug fixes, updated environment support, an updated base theme, overhauled effects, new methods, and new widgets!

The big changes:

  • New widgets: Controlgroup replaces buttonset and adds support for selectmenu and the new checkboxradio widget. You can see the new widgets in action in the controlgroup and checkboxradio demos.
  • New method: The .labels() method finds all label elements associated with the first selected element, mimicking the native labels property.
  • npm/browserify/webpack support: The jquery-ui package on npm is now owned and maintained by the jQuery UI team. In addition, we’ve updated package.json and changed the directory structure to work better with tools like browserify and webpack. See Jörn Zaefferer’s demo for webpack usage information.
  • Effects overhaul: The effects API has received a major overhaul, introducing many new APIs and rewriting effects to use CSS clip for smoother and less error-prone animations. In addition, the transfer effect has been replaced with a .transfer() method.
  • Dropped jQuery 1.6.x support: jQuery UI 1.12 officially supports jQuery 1.7.0 – 2.1.4.
  • Reduced old IE support: jQuery UI 1.11 officially dropped support for IE7 but left all the existing workarounds in place. jQuery UI 1.12 has removed all of the IE7 workarounds. In addition, official support for IE8, IE9, and IE10 have been removed, but the workarounds are still in place and will be removed in 1.13. This coincides with Microsoft’s end of support for these browsers which occurred earlier this month.
  • Bug fixes: Over 50 bugs have been fixed!

For the first time, we have our upgrade guide and API documentation ready during the pre-release phase. For a full list of changes in jQuery UI 1.12, see the list of fixed tickets. And to see what’s coming next, check out our roadmap.

Download

File Downloads

Git (contains source files, with @VERSION not yet replaced with 1.12.0-beta.1, base theme only)

Comments

Note: please do NOT use the comments section of this blog post for reporting bugs. Bug reports should be filed in the jQuery UI Bug Tracker and support questions should be posted on the jQuery Forum.

If you have feedback on us doing our first beta release for jQuery UI 1.12, feel free to leave a comment below. Thank you.